8 Myths about Virtual Reality

 

Myth: VR is just for gaming

The truth is, many industries are seeing very useful, practical applications for virtual reality in training, education, marketing, and visualization. Surgeons are being trained using it, the travel industry is using it to entice would-be vacationers amazing locations, and architects are using it to walk through building ideas without even a foundation being poured in real life! These are just a few of the super cool things being done in VR now, and the industry is just getting off the ground. It’s very exciting to think about what we’ll be doing with this technology in the years to come. 

 

Myth: VR is just another passing fad

This just isn’t so. While the growth of this industry is a bit slower than predicted, it is indeed growing.Major game companies are putting serious effort into creating games and hardware specifically for VR. Additionally, various industries are seeing the great potential in what VR can offer, and are deeply investing in R&D as well as full-blown implementation.

 

Myth: VR is expensive and unobtainable

On the consumer side, just about everyone who would be interested in VR has a smartphone. For less than $20, anyone can pick up a quality Google Cardboard headset and slide their iPhone or Android device right in, download any of the great apps available, and be in VR. 

On the enterprise side, Google Cardboard can also be used. Additionally, fully immersive setups with beefier graphics and control options can be implemented for as little as $2,000-$3,000 per workstation.  This includes VR-ready PC, controllers, and the HMD (head-mounted display).  Software will be an additional cost, but when compared to traditional simulators and other methods of content delivery, there can be significant savings when going with VR. 

 

Myth: VR will turn us all into couch potato zombies

This is far from the truth.  The best VR experiences, both in gaming and in enterprise applications are the ones that take advantage of full body immersion- Cycling applications that use actual stationary bikes, training simulations that let you actually walk through environments and perform tasks with your hands, or games that let you become sword-swinging hero battling your enemies. 

 

Myth: VR has major motion sickness-causing issues

While it’s true that there are a small group of people that are hyper-sensitive to immersive environments, the hardware technology and software techniques have come a long way in the last couple of years.  Quality head-tracking, higher frame rates for content, and various development techniques are why we’re seeing very little queasiness now. If you’d had a bad experience with VR in the earlier development days, it might be worth giving the newest technology another look. 

 

Myth: 360 video is VR

The difference between the 2 is the level of immersion.  In a true virtual reality experience, you are fully immersed in the experience using an HMD (head-mounted display), and not viewing the experience on a screen (as you are with a 360 video). 

 

Myth: AR and VR are the same thing

AR (augmented reality) is not fully immersive. With AR, you are enhancing or augmenting your real life environment.  Digital content is layered over real life. An example of this would be you looking at your car engine with digital directions for how to change the oil is layered on top of it. 

Virtual reality replaces your real life environment. In real life, you may be sitting in your living room, but when you put on the HMD (head-mounted display) you are suddenly on a space ship or in the middle of the Amazon Rainforest. 

 

Myth: VR is a recently developed technology

In actuality, the concept of VR has been around for decades.  The actual term “virtual reality” was coined by Jaron Lanier in 1987, but there are cases of the technology being used as early as the 1960s. Ivan Sutherland has been credited by many as the first person to develop a virtual reality head-mounted display system. It was called The Sword of Damocles and was created in 1968. Another VR pioneer, Morton Heilig, created one of the earliest-known multi-sensory machines, known as the Sensorama, in 1962. 

 

Myth: VR is only for tech-savvy people

VR is for anyone!  It’s useful in job skills training, classroom education, experiencing new places, gaming, and so many other great applications. To use VR software, (in most cases) you just need to be able to follow simple instructions for setting up the hardware. You also need to be able to perform simple tasks on a computer or smartphone (as simple as checking email or navigating a webpage). To experience great content that developers have already produced, you don’t need any special technology or coding skills at all!  There’s nothing to be nervous about!

 

New Medical Illustration Looks

Microsoft Kinect Game for Kids Ready to Go!

This has been one of the funnest projects we've ever had the opportunity to work on. It definitely got us in shape too! In fact, Nick, our lead developer owes his ability to shred the slopes in Colorado last winter to this game! 

The game is designed to deliver workouts to K-12 students in schools.  These workouts consist of various exercises (lunges, squats, jabs, and many others), a trail run, and even an obstacle course in which kids have to run, jump, punch, and kick their way to the finish line! The game can support up to 6 players at a time, so there is bound to be some healthy competition between the little athletes! 

Paired with a robust LMS, teachers will be able to track progress over time and determine how quickly they're able to ramp up difficulty and further tune fitness levels of their students. 

For more information and videos about this game, please click here.

Vue360 Google Cardboard App

One of the projects that we've recently finished is a cool streaming 360/VR video app for Vue360. There are lots more features planned for this app, but right now you can create an account, view videos (with or without a Google Cardboard), and upload your own videos via the companion website

The app is available for iOS and Android

What Are My First Steps for Introducing VR into my Training Programs?

I've been getting so many questions lately along the lines of "What's the best hardware?" and "Where should I focus my attention when it comes to VR training?" and "Is it worth the hype?"  I totally get all of the concerns and confusion. There are tons of hardware options out there and so many software development solutions popping up. 

It's a daunting, high-stakes task.  You're facing higher-ups who simply say "We need to implement the latest and greatest technology" without much more direction. It's up to you to decide between a mobile platform or desktop solution. It's up to you to decide what area of your training should be the home for your VR testing. It's up to you to figure out how to gain the metrics you need to prove the validity of the new training program. 

To help, I put together a guide with lots of great information about virtual reality in enterprise, useful terminology, and a basic outline for getting your started.  At the end of it, you'll feel much more knowledgable about the technology and will be ready to start making a plan!

If this sounds like a resource you need, just head over here to get started!

 

Partnership with Code Crew

We are very excited to announce that The Danse has recently entered into a new internship program partnership with Code Crew

We at CodeCrew are so pleased to have two of our students intern at The Danse this summer. These two young men are getting exposure to world-class skills they would not otherwise be able to learn as high schoolers. We love our partnership with The Danse and look forward to creatively working together in other ways as well.
— Meka Egwuekwe, Executive Director at Code Crew

Code Crew is a wonderful Memphis-based organization that teaches coding skills to K-12 students through summer programs, after school programs, and in-school electives. 

Our internship program, which started this summer, involves us taking on two high school students during summer break.  These students will get to work on virtual reality projects alongside a real software development team and attend development meetings. Our goal is to provide these students some real world work experience involving projects using bleeding edge technology.  

In the fall, we hope to share the wonderful work these kids have done with us!

General Update + Development Screenshots

It's been a while since we've given an update here.  We've just been so busy with projects for all of our great clients, starting a new internship program, and still chipping away at our own internal fun projects. 

We have some cool new medical animations and a couple of great interactive projects to start showing off in the next few months. 

In the meantime, here are some screenshots from Fishy Pinch, a simple VR game we're working on!